Temp Work: Pros and Cons

Article originally appeared in: Cassidy Education by Ashley Andrews

This article nails it. I started off as a temp worker for Brent International School in Subic when I was a fresh grad (or shall we say, fresh out of med school), and that’s the time I decided when I can actually work as a teacher. That environment was enabling and nice that I actually fell in love with teaching. However, getting a job in that workplace is tough because it takes care of its employees very well that the teachers don’t want to leave. I knew I wanted to be in, and so I worked as a temp as it provided me one step inside the house! Obviously that door led me to other places but I know for sure that if it had not be for temping, I know I won’t be in this place now!

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So, you have just finished your university degree!  You have celebrated with friends and family, it is only now you are realising you’ve spent the last seventeen years or more in a formal educational setting.  Now, you are given the most daunting task in your young life – getting your first job!

Many feel the pressure within a few hours of graduating. I know I did, so I went ahead and interviewed for a few companies, made use of the career centre on campus, but all my efforts were essentially fruitless in my search for the ‘dream job’ — one that would satisfy my passions and set me on the right path.

After several applications and interviews I finally found a job as a temporary employee. One year later, it turned out to be a great way to gain an insight on work environments and it allowed me the time needed to reevaluate career goals. I look back on those times with fondness and no regrets.

In case you find yourself in a similar situation, we at Cassidy Education have put together a list of some of the advantages and disadvantages in taking temporary work.

Advantages

Gain Experience

Temping is a great opportunity to see experience different company cultures and discover what you prefer as an employee. It may be that you work best in a fast-paced environment, hate sitting at a desk or like working with children.Temping is a fantastic way to discover the things you are good at and what you really enjoy doing. You are often exposed to career fields you might otherwise never have known, allowing you to make more informed career choices going forward.

Exposure

Temping can help you gain visibility in a crowded and uncertain job market. Plus, if you are just entering the job market, a temporary job could be one of the best ways to get your foot in the door to a permanent position.

As a temp worker, you’ll be represented and will benefit from our vast contact list and our inside knowledge on who’s hiring and what they’re really looking for.

Permanent Employment Potential

If a permanent role is what you ultimately want, the best thing you can do is be a pleasure to work with.  Once you’re on the job as a temp, the employer gets a chance to see you shine. Don’t be surprised if what started out as a week’s assignment turns into a permanent job offer. When that time comes, you’ll know if this is a company that you want to stay with long-term. You don’t have to accept the offer but if you do, be sure to let your recruitment consultant/agency know.

Take Advantage of the Flexibility

Many temp jobs will be 40 hours a week until your assignment is over, when the assignment ends you have the flexibility and can take some time-off if you want. You can also use this flexibility to continue searching for jobs that fall more in line with your career desires, while building on your experiences, skill sets and of course your all important CV.

Make sure to maintain some contact with your consultant and take the occasional placement to ensure they will want to continue working with and representing you.

Be Qualified

Make sure your job knowledge and technical skills are current and up to date. Now that you are entering the job market, agencies and employers are looking for people with first-rate skills.  You must stay sharp to find employment, including temping, make your best efforts at all times.

Seek ways to increase your knowledge and become a ‘mini-expert’ in your field you’ll want to present yourself as uniquely well-informed. Obtain certifications when available.

A combination of classwork and on-the-job experience is the ideal way to prepare yourself for a new line of work. If you can prove that you have some basic skills, it may be that we place you in jobs where you can work under supervision and further enhance your skill set.

Disadvantages

There’s always a downside:

  • You may feel isolated
  • There is a lack of certainty about income
  • You may not have health insurance, a pension plan, or paid vacations
  • There aren’t many disadvantages to temping – but if you like the security of a regular job and being around a consistent circle of peers, you may find temping unfulfilling.
  • Although temping can be great for building skills and knowledge, there is a  high turnover rate.
  • Full-time employment is NOT a guarantee.

In the end, being a temp worker has both advantages and disadvantages. Soak it all up and we hope this helps you make a decision when you are faced with the opportunity to apply for, accept, or deny a temporary position. Good luck and make the most out of temping and all the advantages it offers!

Why Teach Abroad?

Teaching, they say, is a noble profession.

I say teaching is like any other profession: it requires focus, professionalism, sacrifice and sense of humor. Where the noble part came from, I don’t know but for me that’s making the teaching profession look better than it should.

But I know I can say this of teaching though, that it’s not stagnant. Every day is a different day, it’s very social as you get to talk to people (little people), it’s creative because you can twist a lesson to suit your teaching style (not fully creative though as you have parameters to work on, thanks to the curriculum), and you get to be loved by children – priceless! Then of course, travel.

Before I started teaching, I thought the biggest perk was the holidays. I was wrong. Teaching proved to be quite stressful that you actually need to have holidays – like the children need holidays. It’s not a perk – it’s a must. But the other reasons are totally valid, it feels like you’re in the service sector but it’s more personal as you get to develop minds and people.

I grew up in an international setting and I knew I wanted to travel the world. I just didn’t know how. I tried to be a doctor because my psychiatrist-uncle travels around the world working for the United Nations, and it’s always an all expenses paid trip. I loved looking at this display cupboard full of turtle sculptures from Indonesia, glasses from Czech Republic, paintings from Japan – I want that.

So I went to medical school armed with a very different motivation compared to my classmates’ and of course, I flunked. Then I tried teaching in an international school. From medical school and the government office full of locals and the usual Filipino bureacracy, international school teaching for me was back to feeling at home. I can be weird and not judged because, hey, it’s cultural (I’m such a prick). I met various people there that honed my worldliness (hahaha). I get to learn about their culture and learned to be open and tolerant, and not to mention admire the diversity of it all!

My headteacher was from Honduras, the deputy principal was American, the English teacher was British, my Filipino friend there was an ASEAN tae kwon do athlete, the other one was brilliant SEN teacher/cougar and my best friend there was filthy rich and teaching was her hobby! It was colorful and fun. We were housed in a middle of a jungle and all we did after school was cook, go to the beach and play Nintendo wii.

In the next international I worked in, I met Ash. I grew from hanging out with friends to hanging out with my man, who happens to be of a different nationality from me! It is all about growth, and I’m lucky that I have someone I can share intimate details with and learn a different perspective while talking about it.

International schools put a premium on the diversity of cultures that there are always festivals to make the foreigners feel at home. You have to consider that these people left their comfort zone and that is one heck of a difficult thing to do, so you give them stuff to do and things to enjoy, and of course, more money.

I learned that everything changes when your title is an “expat”.

So that’s what I did. I moved countries.

It’s not the easiest thing to do because you just left your whole world but it’s a goddamn great experience to be treated really well (read: spoiled): We are always asked what we need, the owner of the schools treated us to different places (in Hatyai), we never got no for an answer whenever we make a request, may it be school supplies or travel itineraries. It’s so easy to get what you want because the company doesn’t want you unhappy because if you are, you might go home – and they spent a fortune on you! So they have to have a return of investment from you (which means the goodness you experience is fake lol).

However, to sum it all up, teaching internationally is a dream because I can develop my profession in strange and exciting places I wouldn’t thought I’d be in. In international schools, I work with excellent resources and having highly motivated kids make it easier to work. I also work with very compentent teachers because international schools have excellent standards. My adaptation and EQ skills are constantly tested. I know I am a more patient person now. And I can save more now, plus I have enjoy a different kind of respect from the locals, so that’s good. And of course I enjoy a lifestyle that enables me to dream and travel!

At the end of the day it is still a job, and because of the perks, you have to work hard to get to that level. But if you love what you’re doing, or at least you’re doing it for a purpose, you know you will do whatever it takes to be happy, and this is what it is.

Teachers and Teaching: Common Misconceptions

Oh to be a teacher. It’s both a bane and boon. There are people who tell me that they can’t teach because they can’t bear to be with children all the time and it’s too difficult to teach, yet there are also those who say teaching is the easiest job there is and is for backpackers who just want to finance their travels.

As a teacher, I can say that both are truths about the teaching profession and for teachers. But you can also say that for any job: it’s difficult, it’s for lazy people, that they’re only doing it for money, etc. I believe that teaching has more unfair misconceptions though.

Cassidy Education (aka my new favourite education website – useful for those of you looking for teaching jobs too) has enlisted the most common misconceptions about teachers, and I’m sharing it to all of you because it’s a great read, meaning it hits the right spots! Before I became I teacher, I have to admit I judged teachers too, but now that I’m doing it, I know teachers should be respected (like any profession) and this article sums it up pretty well. I swear I muttered “YEAH!”, “so true” while reading, because personally, I hate the “Teaching is easy” misconception. Try keeping your cool while you have 30 odd children either bored or asking for your attention to listen to a grammar lesson! Anyway, you will know what I’m talking about while reading this. Enjoy!

Teachers and Teaching: Common Misconceptions

by Ashley Andrews, originally appeared in the Cassidy Education Blog

Everyone seems to have an opinion on teachers and teaching, from what makes a good/bad teacher, how to teach, what to teach, why teach – the list is endless. Below we explore some of the most common misconceptions and why we believe they’re misconceptions.

Teachers can’t do, that’s why they teach

We hear the statement, “those who can’t do, teach?” all the time. Teachers do so much that it’s hard to believe this statement ever became common place.

Teachers need an in-depth knowledge of their subject and in order to engage their students daily, need to develop many skills, such as;

• adaptive classroom management methods
• have an approach that fosters students’ growth and progress
• provide personalised learning processes

As with all careers a certain set of competencies need to be developed and implemented daily to succeed.

It’s easy being a teacher

It’s easy to see why this is a common misconception. People often think teachers turn up for class at registration, then leave at 3pm and have the summer all to themselves. This is far from the truth.

In actuality, teachers have one of the most emotionally demanding jobs available, they are involved in the lives of their students every day. Teachers care and worry about their students well-being, academic attainment, family and home life, their friends and social lives, and their self confidence.

They invest in their students, dedicating a lot of their personal time honing their skills. The 8am- 3pm workday is fiction, and teachers regularly participate in whole-school activities like curriculum development, prepping lesson plans, marking, parent-teacher consultation and interaction, and after school activities.

Great teachers get great results

Parents and carers often believe teachers to be the only ones responsible for a students’ learning. Teachers are of course an integral part of this, but are definitely not the beginning and end.

Parents play a big role in the learning process, they need to be encouraging at home and show an interest. The biggest factor are the students themselves, if they are not prepared to engage in the subject matter, even if the teacher has delivered on their promise, the student still remains out of the learning process.

Teachers usually have a trick or two they’ll use to engage a disinterested student. A good teacher will attempt to make their lesson plans reflect the students’ interests, in an effort to connect them with the subject material. To further break down any barriers and to peak interest, a teacher should listen and allow students the time to share what is important to them. This element of classroom management becomes more important as an international school teacher, your students will often have very different backgrounds, cultures and experiences and will benefit greatly from a personalised approach to their learning process.

We hope the above helps to debunk a few of the myths and misconceptions about teachers and teaching and you enjoyed reading my blog.

10 Common Questions Teachers Are Asked During The Recruitment Process

I have had 5 workplaces in 5 years, so I think that kinda makes me an experienced job interviewee. Do you know that it’s prime time to look for teaching jobs right now? I know we have had the article How To Ace Your Job Interview but just let’s have another practice before you jump into that interview.

The following article is one of the best resources I have read regarding teaching job interviews. I found it on the teacher recruitment site called Cassidy Education. That blog has some useful articles (it’s new though, so you have to wait for it) on education, especially about SEN teaching. Anyway, here goes.

10 Common Questions Teachers Are Asked During The Recruitment Process

Originally posted on Cassidy Education 

In preparation for your interview, we’ve assembled some common questions that will likely come up during the interview process. See our list of hints and tips below:

Question #1 – I walk into your classroom during one of your lessons, what can I expect to see?

Possible responses:

  • Enthusiastic discussions
  • Clear progress being made both orally and written
  • Engaged students
  • Well-behaved and respectful students

When responding, elaborate on your experiences, achievements and student results.

Question #2 – Describe an account of when you have adopted a behaviour management policy and the effect this had on your students?

When providing your example, remember to explain why the need for the policy in the first place, how you implemented it and the response of the students.  It is also good to demonstrate your own growth from this experience and discuss how you could implement/adapt/improve such a policy in the future.

Question #3 – If I spoke to one of your colleagues, what would they say about you?

The question is really trying to get you to demonstrate your own contribution to school life, not just for students but your peers also.  For extra points you can detail how you wish to be viewed by your colleagues in the future, this is especially important if you are applying for a senior position.

Question #4 – Why is (insert any subject here) taught in schools?

This question looks obvious on the surface but it can be quite a difficult question to answer.  This is more evident when the subject is Maths or English etc as the answer appears obvious initially but when trying to validate the inclusion of said subject in the curriculum it can be very difficult to quantify.

Possible responses:

  • To enhance other subjects
  • Improve a student’s career prospects
  • Encourage independent learning
  • Develop skills (Literacy, numeracy, ICT, etc)
  • Promote self-discipline
  • Improve health and fitness

Your responses will of course be dependent on the subject you teach. Be honest and think outside of the box, provide realistic reasons and support with good examples of how your subject has enriched the life of your students.

Question #5 – Why do you want to work in special education?

Be honest and explain your reasons, remember that your interviewer is looking to see that you understand a need for education over just simply caring for students with Special Educational Needs.

Question #6 – Random question based on an inclusion in your CV.

This is another reason why your CV should always be up to date and only contain genuine qualifications and experience, that way you don’t need to prepare for this too much.  Be honest and answer fully, providing details and examples wherever necessary and possible.

Question #7 – What is it about our school that makes you want to work here?

It is important that you demonstrate to the interviewer you have done some background work about the school and you have specific reasons for wishing to join the school.  Initially you will need to scour their website to familiarise yourself with the school, their policies, campus, etc.  Pick out something that genuinely appeals to you and for extra points, identify some reasons based on your visit and experiences during the interview process.

Question #8 – What do you think students look for in teachers?

To be: fair and consistent, enthusiastic, humourous, passionate about their subject with an ability to involve everyone in the lesson and encourage contributions.

Question #9 – Can you evaluate your one-off lesson?

Teaching a lesson as part of the interview process is often a source of anxiety, but it shouldn’t be, it’s a great way for you to evaluate the school and for the interviewer to evaluate you.  The interviewer will want you to be honest and be self-critical when necessary but also recognises what went well.

Question #10 – What do we lose if we decide not to offer you the position?

This is the closing question often used by interviewers, they want you to sell yourself, let them know what you are about and how you can enhance their school. Remember to be confident and enthusiastic, this is your chance to close the deal.

Right! Now that you’re ready for the interview, let’s take a look at what jobs are currently available.  Click to view Live Jobs on Cassidy Education website or submit your CV so we can aid you in your search.